A Case Study:

Pay the Poet Mobile App

A safe haven for poets to be discovered and paid for their craft

Pay the Poet app phone mockup
A Case Study:

Pay the Poet Mobile App

A safe haven for poets to be discovered and paid for their craft
pay the poet app on phone

Project Brief

Problem Statement

This is a block of text. Double-click this text to edit it.
problem statement

Roles & Responsibilities

Frank (Me):  Lead designer on Accessibility, backup on Interaction & UI design

My Role Details:
  • Ensured accessibility standards guided our design process from very beginning and applied throughout entire project cycle

  • Conducted heuristics review of app during prototyping stage

  • Created storyboards

  • Sketched multiple user flows and processes
Design Team:  Team Infiniti 8
team member frank
Frank | Accessibility
team member austin
Austin | Liaison
team member kamala
Kamala | Research
team member addison
Addison | Content
team member tory
Tory | Craft
team member jerrious
Jerrious | Interaction
team member jordan
Jordan | Usability
team member kayla
Kayla | Storytelling
team member austin
Austin | Liaison
Kamala | Research
team member kamala
team member addison
Addison | Content
Tory | Craft
team member tory
team member jerrious
Jerrious | Interaction
Jordan | Usability
team member jordan
team member frank
Frank | Accessibility
Kayla | Storytelling
team member kayla
client Te'Erra

Client Background & Needs

Our client, Ms. Jones, is an inspiring and passionate poet from Cleveland, OH, who is also a savvy businesswoman with an entrepreneurial spirit.
  
She dreamed of creating a digital space where poets, like herself, can share their work in a community of spoken-word artists, while also getting booked for events, and, most importantly, paid for their craft.
  • Create a social media mobile application on iOS specifically for poets to showcase their work, communicate with other poets, get booked for events, and get paid.

  • 3-week timeline to deliver a lo-fidelity wireframe minimum viable product (MVP).

Users & Audience

  • The primary users are poets of all genres who love to share their art and get exposure as well as those who want to get booked for events and get paid.

  • The secondary users are promoters and event hosts seeking quality talent to fill events as well as fans and supporters of poetry that want to follow their favorite spoken word artists.
poet performing
Scope and Constraints

Scope & Constraints

Our client, Ms. Jones, is an inspiring and passionate poet from Cleveland, OH, who is also a savvy businesswoman with an entrepreneurial spirit.
  
She dreamed of creating a digital space where poets, like herself, can share their work in a community of spoken-word artists, while also getting booked for events, and, most importantly, paid for their craft.
  • Create a social media mobile application on iOS specifically for poets to showcase their work, communicate with other poets, get booked for events, and get paid.

  • 3-week timeline to deliver a lo-fidelity wireframe minimum viable product (MVP).

Design Process

Design Sprint

This is a block of text. Double-click this text to edit it.
design sprint
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Design Process

Kanban Board

Our team used a Kanban board in Jira to help keep us organized, understand the workflow, and on track to meet strict deadlines.
Kanban board
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Design Process

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
human-centered design
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

The Users

Literature Review

Our team used a Kanban board in Jira to help keep us organized, understand the workflow, and on track to meet strict deadlines.
  • After meeting with the client and learning her requirements, we explored the literature on poetry to gain a better understanding on what questions we needed to ask.

  • As you can see 28 million people reported that they read poetry in 2017, and that continues to expand through Instagram and spoken word poetry.
literature review
Google search on android phone

Competitor Analysis

After gaining a better understanding of the poetry landscape, our team searched the Internet for similar apps that met the following criteria:
  • Exclusively for poets

  • Allow others to book poets

  • Where poets can get paid
To our surprise, we found no competitors in this specific market. This was both new and exciting territory for all of us!

Empathy Map

Human-Centered Design

After our preliminary research findings and meeting with our client, we collaborated on a virtual whiteboard in Figma with sticky notes. We tried to understand the thoughts and emotions behind what people may say & do, think & feel, and hear & see while using our app.
empathy map
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Pain Points

Human-Centered Design

After our preliminary research findings and meeting with our client, we collaborated on a virtual whiteboard in Figma with sticky notes. We tried to understand the thoughts and emotions behind what people may say & do, think & feel, and hear & see while using our app.
pain points
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

"How Might We" (HMW) Strategy

Human-Centered Design

Our team again collaborated on a Figma whiteboard and asked some important questions to converge our ideas and help us determine a way towards a digital solution that falls within our project scope.
how might we whiteboard
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Converging Solution

Our team focused on the three most important HMW’s that would solve the client’s needs while also allowing us to complete a minimum viable product (MVP) within a 3-week design sprint.
Our next focus was to develop design goals by using the “How Might We” strategy. We asked ourselves the following questions:
  • How might we make onboarding seamless in the app?

  • How might we display profile content?

  • How might we help poets get paid?
how might we sticky note 1how might we sticky note 2how might we sticky note 3

Customer Journey Map

Human-Centered Design

We then created a customer journey map focusing on our three “HMW's”. We brainstormed how our app could be discovered by poets and how it might attract them to create an account and continue using it. The journey map helped us stay in scope while meeting our clients needs.
customer journey map
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Research Data

Research Data Collected

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

User Surveys

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.
research data landscape

Screener Survey Criteria

Our team focused on the three most important HMW’s that would solve the client’s needs while also allowing us to complete a minimum viable product (MVP) within a 3-week design sprint.
  • User identified as a "poet"

  • User selected "Yes" they've been paid, or "I haven't, but want to be paid"

  • User posts their content on social media or online somewhere

  • User posts new content AT LEAST weekly

  • User opted into the user interview
survey screener
survey question 1

Important Survey Questions

The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:

Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  • Create a social media mobile application on iOS specifically for poets to showcase their work, communicate with other poets, get booked for events, and get paid.

  • 3-week timeline to deliver a lo-fidelity wireframe minimum viable product (MVP).

Important Survey Questions

Question 2:

What type of content do poets upload for their followers?

Key Insight:

Poetry writings were the most popular while poetry readings was a new concept we didn’t originally think of. This told us that the safe haven for poets needed to have the capability to upload audio, video, images, and text.

It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  • Create a social media mobile application on iOS specifically for poets to showcase their work, communicate with other poets, get booked for events, and get paid.

  • 3-week timeline to deliver a lo-fidelity wireframe minimum viable product (MVP).
survey question 2

User Interviews

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.
user interviews whiteboard

Conducting Interviews

The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  • User identified as a "poet"

  • User selected "Yes" they've been paid, or "I haven't, but want to be paid"

  • User posts their content on social media or online somewhere

  • User posts new content AT LEAST weekly

  • User opted into the user interview

Interview Key Insights

The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  1. Poets love Instagram, and are accustomed to Instagram’s upload functions and interface which told us that a mobile app would be the best digital product to build.

  2. PayPal is a popular and secure method of payment that poets trusted.

  3. Poets want exposure and a means to build a following.

  4. Poets want to be able to connect with fans and those who seek to book them.
user interview finding 1user interview finding 2user interview finding 3user interview finding 4

User Persona

Human-Centered Design

After gleaning key insights and pain points from our research, our persona, Melodious Martina was born.  Like most poets and spoken word artists, she is very passionate about her craft because she believes she can change the world by giving a voice to the voiceless and empowering generations to come.
user persona Martina
  • Her pain points and goals reflects our users. They experienced frustration finding reputable venues to perform at and getting paid on time, if at all, for their art even though they attracted hundreds and thousands of people for event hosts.

  • Our research confirmed there is a strong demand for a safe place for poets like Martina to showcase their work and be rewarded through exposure and monetary compensation.
After gleaning key insights and pain points from our research, our persona, Melodious Martina was born.  Like most poets and spoken word artists, she is very passionate about her craft because she believes she can change the world by giving a voice to the voiceless and empowering generations to come.

Her pain points and goals reflects our users. They experienced frustration finding reputable venues
to perform at and getting paid on time, if at all, for their art even though they attracted hundreds and thousands of people for event hosts.

Our research confirmed there is a strong demand for a safe place for poets like Martina to showcase their work and be rewarded through exposure and monetary compensation.

Who will use the app?

Human-Centered Design

  • Poets of all genres who love to share their work

  • Spoken Word Artists looking for exposure and to get booked
  • Promoters and event hosts looking for quality entertainment

  • Poetry lovers, fans and other supporters who want to follow their favorite poets
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Ideate & Create

Decision to Build

Test text.
  • After much research, our insights showed that there was nothing on the market for this type of app and there was heavy demand by poets for this kind of platform.

  • With that in mind, we forged ahead and created a lo-fidelity social media mobile prototype with influence from Instagram and Tumblr.

  • We ensured it met our problem statement by focusing on the poet and making it a safe place for them to share their work and get paid.
pay the poet lo-fidelity prototype

Storyboarding

Human-Centered Design

  • Based off our research and customer journey map, we created a storyboard on our user persona, Martina, to reflect how she might discover our Pay the Poet app.

  • The story that is told helps us visually predict a user’s experience with our app and to better understand how they would flow through the interaction resulting in a better product.
storyboard
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Accessibility

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.
principles of universal design

Important Survey Questions

The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  • Because Pay the Poet is a mobile app, I had to be mindful of the screen size and how to ensure complex screens didn’t overwhelm users which could result in cognitive overload.

  • To keep the app simple, I made sure to apply proper element hierarchy and employed the principles of universal and visual design.

Important Survey Questions

The survey was key in helping us inform our design and decide what type of digital product to create. Two questions stood out to us most:

Question 1:  
What platforms are poets regularly posting their content on currently?

Key Insight:
Our data showed that almost 90% of poets were posting on social media apps. It was important for us to explore these responses further in user interviews.
  • Furthermore, we ensured there was enough space between elements to avoid accidental taps.

  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
principles of visual design

User Flows

Human-Centered Design

Our team mapped out user flows from our earlier user story and journey map while being mindful of our problem statement, client requirements, and research insights. We also recognized the importance of applying accessibility standards while moving forward.
user flow chart
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

App Site Map

Human-Centered Design

We created a static site map that helped us lay out exactly what content should go where and what screens we needed to create.
app site map
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Sketching

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Sketching Collaboration

Our team then collaborated in a group session and began sketching out initial wireframes by employing the 4-up and crazy 8 techniques while being guided by our problem statement and accessibility principles.
  • Furthermore, we ensured there was enough space between elements to avoid accidental taps.

  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
wireframe sketches 1wireframe sketches 1

Onboarding

wireframe sketches onboarding 1

Onboarding

wireframe sketches onboarding 2

Content

wireframe sketches content

Profile

wireframe sketches profile

Sketching Solutions

We followed up our initial sketches by choosing sketch solutions using the sticky decision technique in Figma. We all “voted” by placing sticky notes on sketches that we deemed strongest and were closely aligned with our goals.
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.

My Sketches

Here's a close-up of some of my sketches. I sketched some onboarding screens and some home screens for displaying content. Yeah, my sketching skills need improvement!
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
personal wireframe sketches 1personal wireframe sketches 2

Digital Wireframes

Base Wireframes

Based on our sketch solutions, our craft lead Tory created the first iteration of wireframes in Figma without content as you can see in the three screens listed below:
My Initial Accessibility Review:  Right off, I noticed some elements were too small and the text size didn’t meet best practices for accessibility. I also noticed that all three screens were inconsistent in displaying a title at the top. See elements circled in red.
Screen 1:
'Create Profile' screen in our onboarding process.
base digital wireframe 1
Screen 2:
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
base digital wireframe 2
Screen 3:
'Home' screen content feed, inspired by Instagram & Tumblr.
base digital wireframe 3
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Sketching

Wireframes Iteration

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Screen 1 Iterations

The next round of iterations, we added content, icons, buttons, a navigation menu, and titles on each screen.

After adding these additional elements to provide clarity, I spotted accessibility issues that needed to be addressed. Specifically:

On screen 1, some elements on the ‘Create Profile’ screen are still too small. They need to be bigger for accessibility.
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
Screen 1: Create Profile
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe iteration 1
Screen 2:  Poet Profile
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe iteration 2
Screen 2 Iterations
On screen 2, the poet’s 'Profile' screen, there are three star icons that have three different functions:
  • The star next to the 'Book' button adds the poet to your favorites list.

  • The star in the middle to the right of '25 Posts', takes you to the poet’s favorites.

  • The star on the bottom navigation menu acted as the home button.
This is extremely confusing and needed to be addressed.
Screen 3 Iterations
On screen 3, the 'Home' screen, there were these button and icon issues:
  • The heart and star icons next to each other was confusing because their purposes weren't defined clearly and both could be mistaken for a 'favorites' button.

  • The 'share' button to the right of the star button was poorly defined on what it represents. Most mental models usually defines this icon as an 'upload' button. This needed to be addressed.
Finally, the 'Home' icon in the bottom navigation menu was changed to a more traditional house icon instead of the previous star icon.
Screen 3:  Home
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe iteration 3

Sketching

Wireframes MVP

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.
Screen 1: Create Profile
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe mvp 1
Screen 1 MVP Iterations
After more iterations addressing accessibility, we were confident our wireframes were ready for MVP status. The accessibility worries we had earlier have been addressed.

On screen 1, the 'Create Profile' screen, form fields and fonts are larger while additional spacing was added between form fields.
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
Screen 2 MVP Iterations
On screen 2, the poet’s 'Profile' screen, the second star that was on the top right of the content grid was switched to text to provide more clarity.

In the bottom navigation bar, we changed the star icon to a more traditional home icon. 

We wanted to stick to mental models most users are accustomed to. We also standardized the bottom navigation menu to be the same throughout the app.
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.
Screen 2: Poet Profile
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe mvp 2
Screen 3:  Home
'Profile' screen of a poet, with influence from Instagram.
wireframe mvp 3
Screen 3 MVP Iterations
On screen 3, the 'Home' feed screen, we have the title of the app at the top, similar to Instagram.

We also moved the star that was next to the heart so that it appear next to the user’s name at the top inside the content box and made it actionable so that poet could be easily favorited.

We also changed the 'share' button that looked like an 'upload' button to mimic Instagram’s share icon to be more in line with mental models users are familiar with.
  • Finally, we used consistency throughout the app to make it both usable and learnable so that users would be comfortable using it and have a positive experience while in the app.

The Solution

Lo-Fidelity Prototypes

Human-Centered Design

Our interaction lead Jerrious created a low fidelity prototype in Figma incorporating the research and feedback we received into a product that we could now assess in usability tests.
lo-fidelity prototype 2
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Usability Testing

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Heuristics Evaluation

Using Jakob Nielsen’s 10 Usability Heuristics, Jordan, Kamala, and I deeply analyzed our current prototype. 

We used a sliding scale of 0 to 4 to standardize our feedback. A value of 0 meant we didn't see a usability problem while a 4 meant we had a usability CATASTROPHE.

Fortunately, we only had two catastrophes:
  • Error Prevention (a prompt asking "are you sure you want to upload this?")

  • Help (we didn't have any FAQ's or walkthroughs, etc.)
This evaluation allowed us to continue editing the prototype and ensuring we had accessibility and our users at the top of our minds.
usability heuristics
unmoderated usability test chart

Unmoderated Usability Tests

After completing another iteration of our prototype, prompted by the heuristic evaluation, we then used Maze to conduct 18 unmoderated usability tests and got these results.
  • Our survey participants found the tasks easy to complete!

  • 80% of those who finished the usability test said they would download it!

  • Some tasks were completed through unexpected paths. The heat maps highlighted screens where we needed to increase visual clarity and error prevention (mainly the upload content page).

User Interview Quotes

Human-Centered Design

"What an amazing idea for an app!"
“A social networking app... which emphasizes poets getting paid for their performances!”
“An app for poets to connect and make money.”
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

The Lo-Fidelity Prototype

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Clickable Interactive Prototype

Click or tap on the phone to open an interactive prototype of our Pay the Poet mobile application.
  • Error Prevention (a prompt asking "are you sure you want to upload this?")

  • Help (we didn't have any FAQ's or walkthroughs, etc.)
pay the poet lo-fidelity prototype

Prototype Video

Click or tap on the video to watch a tour of the Pay the Poet mobile application.
  • Error Prevention (a prompt asking "are you sure you want to upload this?")

  • Help (we didn't have any FAQ's or walkthroughs, etc.)

What's Next?

Text placeholder
  • Create a brand guide with a logo, main fonts, and colors

  • Take the research from the latest usability test and apply that feedback to the next design

  • Address additional accessibility concerns

  • Create a hi-fidelity prototype with colors, logo and branding and test it with users
team meeting
pay the poet app on phone

Sneak Peek!

Coming soon, I will be adding additional content on a new update to the Pay the Poet app.

I have further developed the onboarding process and created a hi-fidelity prototype with colors, logo, and branding and completed a few unmoderated usability tests.

Click or tap on the phone to open an interactive prototype of the onboarding process in hi-fidelity.
  • Error Prevention (a prompt asking "are you sure you want to upload this?")

  • Help (we didn't have any FAQ's or walkthroughs, etc.)

Conclusion

Reflections

Human-Centered Design

While practicing lean-agile methodologies, we often made reference to a human-centered design and implementation process.
research data landscape
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.

Important Survey Questions

It was my first time working on a team in a design sprint. It was challenging, stressful, awesome, very time-consuming, and rewarding! We looked out for each other, we laughed, we bickered, but mostly, we took pride in bringing the client's idea to life!
  • It was my first time working on a team in a design sprint. It was challenging, stressful, awesome, very time-consuming, and rewarding! We looked out for each other, we laughed, we bickered, but mostly, we took pride in bringing the client's idea to life!
reflection orb
reflection orb 3

Important Survey Questions

It was also my first time really learning about accessibility and how to apply it to a design project. At first it was daunting because of all the accessibility standards and principles I had to try and remember. I wasn't confident I could pull it off at first. 

However, I quickly learned it is part of a continuous iterative process to apply accessibility and eventually get it to a place where the app is both usable and learnable. Awesome learning experience!
  • It was also my first time really learning about accessibility and how to apply it to a design project. At first it was daunting because of all the accessibility standards and principles I had to try and remember. I wasn't confident I could pull it off at first. However, I quickly learned it is part of a continuous iterative process to apply accessibility and eventually get it to a place where the app is both usable and learnable. Awesome learning experience!

Important Survey Questions

I learned to overcommunicate in a team of eight. With that many people working in their own lead roles, it was very easy to overlap and step on one’s toes. Transparency was our mantra to prevent animosity between team members.
  • I learned to overcommunicate in a team of eight. With that many people working in their own lead roles, it was very easy to overlap and step on one’s toes. Transparency was our mantra to prevent animosity between team members.
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User Interview Quotes

Human-Centered Design

"I absolutely LOVE it!  Y'all did a phenomonal job!  I know I kept you up at night working."
− Te'Erra Jones, the Client
  • We operated as a lean Agile team using the SCRUM method in a fast-paced 3-week design sprint.

  • We brainstormed, researched and gathered data, interviewed users, and created storyboards. We also fleshed out user flows and app maps, sketched wireframes, built digital wireframes and interactive prototypes, tested them, and presented our solution to stakeholders, our client, and my assessor.
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